Last edited by Volkree
Monday, August 10, 2020 | History

2 edition of On the development of spectacles in London from the end of the seventeenth centur found in the catalog.

On the development of spectacles in London from the end of the seventeenth centur

Thomas H. Court

On the development of spectacles in London from the end of the seventeenth centur

first paper on the court collection

by Thomas H. Court

  • 30 Want to read
  • 3 Currently reading

Published by Cambridge University Press in Great Britain .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Eyeglasses -- England -- London -- History.

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby Thomas H. Court and Moritz von Rohr.
    ContributionsRohr, M. von 1868-1940.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination21p. :
    Number of Pages21
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL20210317M

    Glassware - Glassware - Midth to midth century: A glass industry was already established near Venice in the 7th century, and vessel glass was made there by the last quarter of the 10th century. In the glass furnaces were removed to the neighbouring island of Murano to remove the risk of fire from the city. Although Venice had constant contact with the East, there . The Cambridge History of Seventeenth-Century Music (The Cambridge History of Music) Tim Carter, John Butt Contributors explore new aspects of composition and performance in this comprehensive examination of the repertory, institutions, performers, composers, and social and cultural world of one of the greatest moments in music history.

      This fall, there was another seventeenth-century masque playing in London, John Milton’s “Comus: A Masque in Honour of Chastity,” at . The origins of London slums date back to the mid eighteenth century, when the population of London, or the “Great Wen,” as William Cobbett called it, began to grow at an unprecedented rate. In the last decade of the nineteenth century London's population expanded to four million, which spurred a high demand for cheap housing.

      A fascinating overview of the seventeenth century in Europe as the century of the birth of new ideas that prepares for the eighteenth century, but, in its own way, is liberating from old ideas and shares the commonly accepted importance of the eighteenth century in setting the world on a new course, indeed: creating the modern s:   Towards the end of the century small steps were made to improve these conditions. Several ‘paving acts’ were passed in London during the s, for example, that resulted in the more efficient drainage and mending of roads, and helping to .


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On the development of spectacles in London from the end of the seventeenth centur by Thomas H. Court Download PDF EPUB FB2

By then, it was nearly 17 miles from end to end, straddling the great river and swallowing up whole villages, but in just the last years, London continued to grow, increasing its population by. On the development of spectacles in London from the end of the seventeenth centuryCited by: 6.

A HISTORY OF LONDON IN THE 17TH CENTURY. By Tim Lambert. The Growth of London. The population of London was aboutby and during the 17th century London continued to grow.

Banqueting House was built in In the king opened Hyde Park to the public. In Charles I created Richmond Park for hunting. The seventeenth-century diarist Walter Powell of Llantilio Crossenny, in Monmouthshire, endured the procedure three times and still carried on with his diary afterwards, so presumably his vision was little worse if it wasn’t much better.

The wearing of spectacles was certainly known in Tudor times. The Highland Society of London, formed input an emphasis on bagpiping, particularly the ceòl mór (the great music), which had developed for ceremonial purposes for the Gaelic aristocracy from the seventeenth century.

From the society organised ceòl mór competitions that became the basis for later gatherings in Scotland. Though the rent rose to £13 6s. a year init had fallen to only £4 by the end of the century. (fn. 17) It was perhaps because of the decline of the Cross fair that the corporation sought gentry support for a new livestock and mixed goods fair, to be held in February, and that fair was instituted by the charter of Other similar finds dating to the early 15 th century have since been made at a former trash site in Freiburg, Germany (two very early pair) and in London (both the "Trig Lane" spectacles and the "Swan Stairs" spectacles).

In the Netherlands, ina nearly complete pair was unearthed in Windesheim, and another was found in in Bergen op. Fisher, F. (), ‘ The development of London as a centre of conspicuous consumption in the sixteenth and seventeenth century ’, Transactions of.

The 17th century was the century that lasted from January 1,to Decem It falls into the Early Modern period of Europe and in that continent (whose impact on the world was increasing) was characterized by the Baroque cultural movement, the latter part of the Spanish Golden Age, the Dutch Golden Age, the French Grand Siècle dominated by Louis XIV, the.

This book focuses both on friendships represented in imaginative works and on lived friendships in many textual and material forms, in an attempt to recognize cultural environments and functions.

In order to provide depth and coherence, case histories have been selected from the middle and later parts of the seventeenth century. The term ‘history painting’ was introduced by the French Royal Academy in the seventeenth century.

It was seen as the most important type (or ‘genre’), of painting above portraiture, the depiction of scenes from daily life (called genre painting), landscape and still life painting.

(See the glossary page for genres to find out more). Although initially used to describe paintings with. In this pioneering and important book, Philippe Aries surveys children and their place in family life from the Middle Ages to the end of the eighteenth century.

The first section of the book explores the gradual change from the medieval attitude to children, looked upon as small adults as soon as they were past infancy, to the seventeenth and eighteenth century awareness of the child as.

The first known example is a book on ink-cakes printed inand colour technique reached its height in books on painting published in the seventeenth century.

Notable examples are Hu Zhengyan 's Treatise on the Paintings and Writings of the Ten Bamboo Studio of[7] and the Mustard Seed Garden Painting Manual published in and   1. Introduction. Versions of atomism developed by seventeenth-century mechanical philosophers, referred to hereafter as mechanical atomism, were revivals of Ancient Greek atomism, with the important difference that they were presumed to apply only to the material world, and not to the spiritual world of the mind, the soul, angels and so on.

A Book of Hours B. An altarpiece C. A large fresco D. a detailed woodcut. A book of hours London c. Rome d. Amsterdam.

Two factions in the French Academy at the end of the seventeenth century were the "Poussinistes" and the a. Rubenistes b. Watteauists c. Canaletti d. Caravaggisti. Full text of "The English fireplace: a history of the development of the chimney, chimney-piece and firegrate with their accessories, from the earliest times to the beginning of the XIXth century" See other formats.

The most refined part of London is still Mayfair, and Piccadilly Circus is where Soho begins. Soho and Trafalgar Square. Built at the end of the seventeenth century, it was the city's most elegant neighbourhood until the beginning of the nineteenth century.

Its chilled pubs and bars are a favourite among artists and intellectuals. Dr Johnson's Spectacles. These tortoiseshell spectacles with extremely short right-angled 'temple' sides were allegedly worn by that great literary figure of the century, Dr Samuel Johnson ().

Whilst the association is perhaps unproven, they are certainly of the right date to coincide with the end of his life. The nineteenth century customer had a wide choice of corrective visual devices of which spectacles were only one. This famous print Les Lunettes by Louis-Léopold Boilly() shows five French men and women using different types of optical aid including a quizzing glass, folding lorgnette, wig spectacles with jointed sides, nose spectacles and a spyglass.

The rise of atheism and unbelief is a key feature in the development of the modern world, yet it is a topic which has been little explored by historians. This book presents a series of studies of irreligious ideas in various parts of Europe during the two centuries following the Reformation. Atheism was illegal everywhere.

The word itself first entered the vernacular languages soon. This is a fantastic little paperback book which opens up an interesting history of the expanding commercial and social life in Dutch 17th century, prompted by discussions on Vermeer's paintings.

I would have given the book 5 stars for the content, but the illustrations of Vermeer's paintings in my book are just black s: A major reason for the leading role of monarchs in the development of states was the fact that.

In the seventeenth century, French kings Louis XIII and Louis XIV. saw French Protestants as enemies of the state. In contrast to its Continental counterparts, the English Parliament.Earle, Peter, A City Full of People: Men and Women of London, (London, ) George, Dorothy, London Life in the Eighteenth Century (London, 2nd edn, ) Schwarz, L.D., London in the Age of Industrialisaton: Entrepreneurs, Labour Force and Living Conditions, (Cambridge, ).